2.1. WORD PRACTICE IN THE FIELDS

We can manage the grammatical time as in our Fields for the grammatical PRESENT, PAST, or FUTURE.

 

Verb forms change for the grammatical time.
Not all are regular in this.

 

Most dictionaries have lists of irregular verbs. The lists show the first, second, and third form, for irregular verbs.

 

Infinitive: to ring (irregular verb)

 

FIRST FORM

SECOND FORM

THIRD FORM

1ST

2ND

3RD

ring

rang

rung

 

Regular verbs take ED in their second and third forms.

 

Infinitive: to sound (regular verb)

 

FIRST FORM

SECOND FORM

THIRD FORM

1ST

2ND

3RD

sound

sounded

sounded

 

We are only beginning our language journey with verbs. For the practice here, we can stay with their first and second forms. Some knowledge on the base form and the infinitive should help work with grammar resources.

 

We build the infinitive with the basic form of the verb and the particleto”.

 

ring & to
the infinitive: to ring

 

For most verbs in English, the base form is going to be the same as the first form.
I will write tomorrow, the FUTURE;
(“write” is the first and the basic form of the verb to write).

 

The verb form “will” does not have the infinitive. We use the first form of it, for the grammatical FUTURE.

 

For our other core grammar verbs, as to be or to have, we can think about a bare infinitive. It is the infinitive without the particle “to”.

 

I will be home tomorrow, the FUTURE;
(“be” is the bare infinitive of the verb to be;
the first forms are
am, is, are).

 

Let us note that the particle “to” does not belong only with the infinitive. To tell the difference, we mind if the particle comes with a verb or a noun. The infinitive is a form of a verb.

 

I like to listen to music
(the PRESENT Field, the infinitive is underlined).
I often listen to music
(the PRESENT Field, no infinitive).

 

APPENDIX 1 has more about verbs (please see the EXTRAS).

 

APPENDIX 2 and APPENDIX 3 show verb speech sound patterns. Irregular verbs are easier to learn with those language melodies.

 

Exercise 5. Let us put the verbs in forms proper for the indicated grammatical time.

 

 

In simple words,
let us put the verbs in Fields of Time.

 

Our vocoid pattern here is [I:] ― [e:] ― [e:].

 

In simple words,
the language melody for the verbs has a contour as
[I:] ― [e:] ― [e:]

 

FIRST FORM

SECOND FORM

THIRD FORM

1ST

2ND

3RD

leave

left

left

 

Example: PAST (leave)

 

Answer: left

 

1. FUTURE (leave)

 

2. PRESENT (mean)

 

3. PRESENT (meet)

 

4. PAST (read)

 

5. FUTURE (sleep)

 

6. PAST (sweep)

 

7. PAST (sleep)

 

8. PRESENT (read)

 

9. FUTURE (meet)

 

10. PRESENT (sweep)

 

Exercise 6. We can try our language natures another way round. We tell the Field of Time by the shape of the verb. By standard, we show pronunciation — the way to say a word — in square brackets.

 

Example: left

 

Answer: (time first) PAST (leave)

 

1. meet(s); 2. read [re: d]; 3. read [rI: d]; 4. will sleep; 5. will leave; 6. met; 7. mean(s); 8. meant; 9. slept; 10. swept.

 

Verbs can make patterns we name the Simple, Progressive, and Perfect. Feel welcome to further grammar journey.
CHAPTER 3. TIME IS LIKE A RIVER.

LINK TO CHAPTER 3: THE SIMPLE, PROGRESSIVE, AND PERFECT

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LINK: READ THIS IN A SLAVIC LANGUAGE, POLISH

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