10.2. FORM RELATIVITY: THE PROGRESSIVE

We noted on feature transfer for the anchor HAVE, modal time tends to net or ignore duration; possibly, it would not merely repeat on real-time variables. It would be feature transfer as well to allow for the Progressive to activate with the auxiliary rather than main time, in Modal patterns. ■→More

9.4. MODAL RELATIVITY PRACTICE

Human lives are not just stories, but the narrator time can help comprehend the notional time, the time of the person who speaks. There is no universal notional time. We have to learn to keep own notional time. We can have it for our psychological or mind time, too. We use Mark Twain's Huckleberry stories. ■→More

9.3. DETAIL ON MODAL STRUCTURES

Modal syntax cannot do for Expression, as the Affirmative or Negative; for these, we practice inversion and negation inclusive of Modal syntax. ■→More

CHAPTER 9. TO TELL THE FASHION IN VALUABLE TIME

Modal verbs do not really state on the Time and Aspect. They mediate between the two and behave very different from regular verbs for that. ■→More

8.2. PRACTICE FOR ALL ASPECTS

We do not have language only to talk with people. We use it to read, write, and think as well. It is important that we try to represent feelings and thoughts in language. We may think about time and change. ■→More

8.1. EARTHLING BASIC VARIABLE

Planet Earth has been a human natural habitat for millennia. In thousands of years, people to think what there is {ON} a map, have not denied plausibility for places {IN} areas, routes {TO} places, as well as locations {AT} them. Early childhood learning to talk has been getting along with learning to walk. For all English Aspects and tenses, this is always the first element in the verb pattern to change for the grammatical time, and that as for the variable {ON}. ■→More

CHAPTER 8. A PERFECT AND PROGRESSIVE REGARD

The Perfect Progressive is a merger of the Perfect and the Progressive. We have room for the head verb in the merged part of the Progressive pattern. Simple or Progressive, Perfect tenses have an open time frame. ■→More

7.1. PRACTICE FOR THE HEART AND THE MIND

We learn to decide on own use of the Progressive ING, and the variable {ON}. Our answers do not have to be identical. We people differ in verb use. ■→More

CHAPTER 7. TIME IN THE MIND AND HEART

There are many grammar books to tell about “stative” or “static verbs”; that we should never use them with the Progressive; that phrases as "I am loving you" or "I am hating you" are incorrect. In fact, such phrases do occur also in educated styles, and more, without the brain and mind, the heart is just a muscle. ■→More

5.3. PRACTICE: REAL SYNTAX AND MORE WORDS

Abbreviated verb forms are really much in use in American English. It is important to learn telling them. We first try the exercises in our thoughts, as in the Mind Practice. ■→More

5.2. PRACTICE: SYMBOLIC CUES AND REAL SYNTAX

Symbols can be really helpful, whe we want effective and effortless language habits. Let us combine the Aspect and Time, to exercise symbolic cues. We try only to think about our answers: true learning is in the mind. ■→More

5.1. THE LOGIC SO FAR

We sum up on the grammar logic here so far, and visualize Time along with Aspect as for moving about; hiking, for example. ■→More

CHAPTER 5. LET US MAKE OWN PATHS ABOUT TIME

The Affirmative, Interrogative or Negative may look rare or even strange, if we think about everyday language. Let us reckon on something usual as a strawberry, to work these phrases out. ■→More

4.2. PRACTICE: ASPECT COGNITIVE MAPPING

To think about grammatical time, we do not have to feel bound to fields and land travel, even if only symbolically. We can imagine a bald eagle ON Mount Elbert. He nests IN a valley, flies TO the mountain top, and stays AT the summit, for warm days. The eagle route has four types of reference. ■→More

CHAPTER 4. TIME RAMBLES DIFFERENT WITH DIFFERENT PEOPLE

Human walking or other moving about needs place and time, yet it does not need anybody to describe, give rules or definitions. We can connect the grammatical aspect and basic ways we people orientate in physical space. More→

3.4. PRACTICE FOR THE SHAPE OF TIME

We have a little exercise on Aspect pattern build, before we reckon on Aspect use. To get along at school, we think about grammar labels, that is, if patterns are the Simple, Progressive, Future, Past, or another — the way as in our Mind Practice, 3 minutes to read. ■→More

3.3. THE BIG CHART FOR THREE PERSONS AND PATHS

We put together the Simple, Progressive, and the Perfect, with all personal pronouns and in all three fields of time. ■→More

3.2. THE PERSON ‘YOU’

In a standard, face-to-face conversation, it is naturally easy to tell if we speak with one or more persons. However, the pronoun you has evolved into the same shape for the singular and the plural. The form is also the same as verb object. ■→More

3.1. THE FIELDS AND THE RIVER OF TIME

Whether English is spoken or written, verb forms be and have are the most usual to occur. We can extract patterns for the Simple, Progressive, and Perfect. ■→More

CHAPTER 3. TIME IS LIKE A RIVER

Everyday language has phrases as a flow or passage of time, a course or current of events: we people happen to have such impressions about life and time. Let us imagine a river of time. There are word patterns to show in the river, and there are pods of time to surface with them. We need to use a pattern, for a pod to carry us through. ■→More .

APPENDIX 4. PATTERNS FOR ALL ASPECTS

The Simple, Progressive, Perfect, and Perfect Progressive, in the Affirmative, Interrogative, Negative, and Negative Interrogative, for the Future, Present, and PAST, and for all grammatical persons.