6.3. EXERCISES: THE ASPECT AND THE TIME FRAME

PICTURE: CAMILLE PISSARRO, BOULEVARD MONTMARTRE, MORNING, CLOUDY WEATHER

Mind practice for the Aspect and the time frame.
2. The skylark found nothing to outbid the bit of cosmos with a squid.
8. The spotted redshank bachelorette did reset her buret for the bouncing bet. More→
Joke emoticon

6.2. GRAMMAR COGNITIVE GROUND

Isolated word form, whether auditory or visual, is not enough to convey language information. We can work our time frames only in context.

5.3. PRACTICE: REAL SYNTAX AND MORE WORDS

Abbreviated verb forms are really much in use in American English. It is important to learn telling and using them. For irregular verbs, we have appendixes with high and low, or back and front vowel patterns. We take the exercises in our minds, as in our Mind practice. More→.

5.2. PRACTICE: SYMBOLIC CUES AND REAL SYNTAX

Our brains can work with verbal paths as well as visualization. It does not mean we have to stay with the words or visuals, especially forever. These are just to help. Importantly, without knowing where we are about faculties, activities, or states, we could be only repeating formulas after other people.

CHAPTER 5. LET US MAKE OWN PATHS ABOUT TIME

The Affirmative, Interrogative, Negative, and Negative Interrogative, for the Simple, Progressive, and Perfect Aspects.

4.2. PRACTICE: ASPECT COGNITIVE MAPPING

Written or spoken texts do not determine our inner language. We can learn to focus on the Aspect, gather our verb forms from elements, as well as take language tasks "at the drop of the hat", when our inner language integrates the essentials.

3.4. PRACTICE FOR THE SHAPE OF TIME

We have a little exercise on Aspect pattern build, before we reckon on Aspect use. To get along at school, we think about grammar labels, that is, if patterns are the Simple, Progressive, Future, Past, or another — the way as in our Mind Practice, 3 minutes to read. ■→More

3.3. THE BIG CHART FOR THREE PERSONS AND PATHS

We put together the Simple, Progressive, and the Perfect, with all personal pronouns and in all three fields of time. ■→More

3.2. THE PERSON ‘YOU’

In a standard, face-to-face conversation, it is naturally easy to tell if we speak with one or more persons. However, the pronoun you has evolved into the same shape for the singular and the plural. The form is also the same as verb object. ■→More

3.1. THE FIELDS AND THE RIVER OF TIME

Whether English is spoken or written, verb forms be and have are the most usual to occur. We can extract patterns for the Simple, Progressive, and Perfect. ■→More