6.3. EXERCISES: THE ASPECT AND THE TIME FRAME

Mind practice for the Aspect and the time frame.
2. The skylark found nothing to outbid the bit of cosmos with a squid.
8. The spotted redshank bachelorette bewailed and reset her buret for the bouncing bet. ■→More

6.2. ASPECT COGNITIVE VARIABLE AND TIME FRAME

Madame Règle is not a systematic person at all. The only regularity about her would be a small book she always carries fastened to her bag with a scarf or, actually, a variety of scarves of many colors and textures. The book is not the same book every day, and the choice of the scarf sure depends on some totally unpredictable factor, just as the exact time for lunch, for which you might want to assume the broad time frame of about sixty minutes to commence or not to happen altogether. ■→More

5.3. PRACTICE: REAL SYNTAX AND MORE WORDS

Abbreviated verb forms are really much in use in American English. It is important to learn telling them. We first try the exercises in our thoughts, as in the Mind Practice. ■→More

5.2. PRACTICE: SYMBOLIC CUES AND REAL SYNTAX

Symbols can be really helpful, whe we want effective and effortless language habits. Let us combine the Aspect and Time, to exercise symbolic cues. We try only to think about our answers: true learning is in the mind. ■→More

CHAPTER 5. LET US MAKE OWN PATHS ABOUT TIME

The Affirmative, Interrogative or Negative may look rare or even strange, if we think about everyday language. Let us reckon on something usual as a strawberry, to work these phrases out. ■→More

4.2. PRACTICE: ASPECT COGNITIVE MAPPING

To think about grammatical time, we do not have to feel bound to fields and land travel, even if only symbolically. We can imagine a bald eagle ON Mount Elbert. He nests IN a valley, flies TO the mountain top, and stays AT the summit, for warm days. The eagle route has four types of reference. ■→More

3.4. PRACTICE FOR THE SHAPE OF TIME

We have a little exercise on Aspect pattern build, before we reckon on Aspect use. To get along at school, we think about grammar labels, that is, if patterns are the Simple, Progressive, Future, Past, or another — the way as in our Mind Practice, 3 minutes to read. ■→More

3.3. THE BIG CHART FOR THREE PERSONS AND PATHS

We put together the Simple, Progressive, and the Perfect, with all personal pronouns and in all three fields of time. ■→More

3.2. THE PERSON ‘YOU’

In a standard, face-to-face conversation, it is naturally easy to tell if we speak with one or more persons. However, the pronoun you has evolved into the same shape for the singular and the plural. The form is also the same as verb object. ■→More

3.1. THE FIELDS AND THE RIVER OF TIME

Whether English is spoken or written, verb forms be and have are the most usual to occur. We can extract patterns for the Simple, Progressive, and Perfect. ■→More

2.1. MORE WORDS IN THE FIELDS

Verbs may change in shape for the PRESENT, PAST, and FUTURE, and not all are regular in this. We exercise verb 1st and 2nd forms in the fields of time. ■→More

1.1. FIELDS OF TIME: BASIC PRACTICE

Learning a language always requires thinking, but it does not require difficulty. The simple exercises here are to help work out flexible habits that can contribute to advanced language skill. More→

CHAPTER 1. WE CAN PLAN ON TIME AS IN FIELDS

We cannot touch time. We cannot see or hear time. Clocks can show the time only as we set it, and grammatical time is not the same thing as the hour. How can we learn the grammatical time, then? To an extent, we may think about time together with place. More→