6.2. ASPECT COGNITIVE VARIABLE AND TIME FRAME

Madame Règle is not a systematic person at all. The only regularity about her would be a small book she always carries fastened to her bag with a scarf, or actually a variety of scarves, of many colors and textures. The book is not the same book every day, and the choice of the scarf sure depends on some totally unpredictable factor, just as the exact time for lunch, for which you might want to assume the broad time frame of about sixty minutes to commence or not to happen altogether. ■→More

6.1. OUR LINGUISTIC GRAVITATION

Our time extents, PRESENT and PAST, do not change for punctuation. They do not change for the Aspect, Simple or Perfect, either. To continue our work on the two Aspects, we choose on the grammatical time frame. ■→More

5.3. PRACTICE: REAL SYNTAX AND MORE WORDS

Abbreviated verb forms are really much in use in American English. It is important to learn telling them. We first try the exercises in our thoughts, as in the Mind Practice. ■→More

5.2. PRACTICE: SYMBOLIC CUES AND REAL SYNTAX

We combine the Aspect and Time, to exercise target grammatical time. We think the answers: true learning is in the mind. ■→More

CHAPTER 5. LET US MAKE OWN PATHS ABOUT TIME

Phrases as the the Affirmative, Interrogative or Negative may look rare or even strange, if we compare everyday language. Let us think about something usual as a strawberry, to work them out. ■→More

4.2. PRACTICE: ASPECT COGNITIVE MAPPING

To think about grammatical time, we do not have to feel bound to fields and land travel, even if only symbolically. We can imagine a bald eagle {ON} Mount Elbert. He is nesting {IN} a valley, has flown {TO} the mountain top today, and has been staying {AT} the summit, all this warm day. The eagle route has four types of reference. ■→More

3.1. THE FIELDS AND THE RIVER OF TIME

Whether English is spoken or written, verb forms be and have are the most usual to occur. We can extract patterns for the Simple, Progressive, and Perfect. ■→More

2.1. MORE WORDS IN THE FIELDS

Verbs may change in shape for the PRESENT, PAST, and FUTURE, and not all are regular in this. We exercise verb 1st and 2nd forms in the fields of time. ■→More

COLORS CAN HELP READ AND LEARN

In our language journey, pronouns and nouns are ink blue. Highlights and mapping extents are forget-me-not, blue. We avoid color red, for the prevalent and adverse associations with prescriptive opinion on language. ■→More