6.5. THE TARGET TIME AND FRAME

We have our time frames for our guidance. Overall, we can choose between the Simple and the Perfect, in the PAST time compass. We are about to think on talking about feelings and minds. Chantelle’s first book tells about a girl’s language of the heart. Art Veltall is thinking about a job change. Contending his mother-in-law yet resembles trying verbally to captivate a moving rock …

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5.3. PRACTICE: REAL SYNTAX AND MORE WORDS

All verbs here can be irregular. Feel welcome to APPENDIX 2: it marks American English forms as AE, when they differ from British forms, BR. We continue practicing abbreviated verb forms, as in EXERCISE 28.   ’m: am ’re: are ’s: is ’ve: have ’s: has ’d: had   We can tell abbreviated “is” from … Continue reading 5.3. PRACTICE: REAL SYNTAX AND MORE WORDS

5.2. PRACTICE: SYMBOLIC CUES AND REAL SYNTAX

Our brains can work with verbal paths as well as visualization. It does not mean we have to stay with the words or visuals, especially forever. These are just to help. Importantly, without knowing where we are about faculties, activities, or states, we could be only repeating formulas after other people.

5.1. THE LOGIC SO FAR

We can envision our grammar journey as traveling in an abstract dimension. However, we can think about the Cartesian coordinates, just as in our natural, three-dimensional realities.

CHAPTER 5. LET US MAKE OWN PATHS ABOUT TIME

The Affirmative, Interrogative, Negative, and Negative Interrogative, for the Simple, Progressive, and Perfect Aspects.

1.1. FIELDS OF TIME: BASIC PRACTICE

The verbs BE, HAVE, and DO in exercises for the grammatical PRESENT, PAST, and FUTURE.

CHAPTER 1. WE CAN PLAN ON TIME AS IN FIELDS

We cannot touch time. We cannot see or hear time. Clocks can show the time only as we set it, and grammatical time is not the same thing as the hour. How can we learn the grammatical time, then? To an extent, we may think about time together with place. More→