7.1. PRACTICE FOR THE HEART AND THE MIND

The Simple and Progressive Aspects compared: "stative verb" use described with regard to human cognitive activity.

CHAPTER 7. TIME IN THE MIND AND HEART

We may find grammar books to tell about “stative” or “static verbs”. The books give lists of such verbs to remember and not to use with the Progressive. Let us think if we could list all words we might associate with love and hate in the alphabetical order, for example? Listing the words would take a long time, and we can speak, write, and read real-time.

6.5. THE TARGET TIME AND FRAME

We have our time frames for our guidance. Overall, we can choose between the Simple and the Perfect, in the PAST time compass. We are about to think on talking about feelings and minds. Chantelle’s first book tells about a girl’s language of the heart. Art Veltall is thinking about a job change. Contending his mother-in-law yet resembles trying verbally to captivate a moving rock …

5.3. PRACTICE: REAL SYNTAX AND MORE WORDS

Abbreviated verb forms are really much in use in American English. It is important to learn telling and using them. For irregular verbs, we have appendixes with high and low, or back and front vowel patterns. We take the exercises in our minds, as in our Mind practice. More→.

5.2. PRACTICE: SYMBOLIC CUES AND REAL SYNTAX

Our brains can work with verbal paths as well as visualization. It does not mean we have to stay with the words or visuals, especially forever. These are just to help. Importantly, without knowing where we are about faculties, activities, or states, we could be only repeating formulas after other people.

5.1. THE LOGIC SO FAR

We can envision our grammar journey as traveling in an abstract dimension. However, we can think about the Cartesian coordinates, just as in our natural, three-dimensional realities.

CHAPTER 5. LET US MAKE OWN PATHS ABOUT TIME

The Affirmative, Interrogative, Negative, and Negative Interrogative, for the Simple, Progressive, and Perfect Aspects.

4.2. PRACTICE: ASPECT COGNITIVE MAPPING

To think about grammatical time, we do not have to feel bound to fields and land travel, even if only symbolically. We can imagine a bald eagle ON Mount Elbert. He nests IN a valley, flies TO the mountain top, and stays AT the summit, for warm days. The eagle route has four types of reference. ■→More

CHAPTER 4. TIME RAMBLES DIFFERENT WITH DIFFERENT PEOPLE

Human walking or other moving about needs place and time, yet it does not need anybody to describe, give rules or definitions. We can connect the grammatical aspect and basic ways we people orientate in physical space. More→

3.4. PRACTICE FOR THE SHAPE OF TIME

We have a little exercise on Aspect pattern build, before we reckon on Aspect use. To get along at school, we think about grammar labels, that is, if patterns are the Simple, Progressive, Future, Past, or another — the way as in our Mind Practice, 3 minutes to read. ■→More