10.3. FORM RELATIVITY PRACTICE

We learn to perceive the nodal time:
B. The grain of sand did one hour of thinking about composite things a day, and appreciated the activity as emotionally valid. ■→More

10.1. UNREAL OR REAL TIME

No group and no Government can properly prescribe precisely what should constitute the body of knowledge with which true education is concerned.
— President Franklin Delano Roosevelt ■→More

CHAPTER 10. FORM RELATIVITY GALORE

With theory making, PAST forms refer to the PRESENT, and PRESENT forms refer to the FUTURE. It is only the anchored PAST to stay in the PAST. Theory making is similar in Polish, Russian, French, and other languages:
if I was, si j’étais, gdybym był/a, если бы я был/а, wäre ich, etc.
Our language form relativity has nothing to do with ■→Whorfianism. ■→More

9.4. MODAL RELATIVITY PRACTICE

We "target" and "jump" grammatical time extents with Mark Twain's Huckleberry Finn, and as about the Wester, the two Yellowlegs, or later the Tiny, we learn to keep own thinking against even unusual words: it is better for grammar to be mind-teasing, than mind-boggling. ■→More   

9.3. DETAIL ON MODAL STRUCTURES

Questions as mayn't you have done or mustn't you have done would be rare in American, and they might impress unfavorably, as superfluous or even incorrect. The preference is for patterns without syntactic HAVE, and we can try to explain this with human logic. ■→More

9.2. THE MODAL NET

We have considered two sides of a hypothetical fruit. Let us now think if we could arrive at the theory “net weight”: when we people make theories, it is usually to get to something real. ■→More

9.1. AUXILIARY HAVE AND MODAL SYNTAX

If we say that something is a fruit, it is a possible fruit, or maybe it must be fruit, but we do not know the kind, it is first of all our thought process we manage. Auxiliary HAVE can be quite some handle. ■→More

CHAPTER 9. TO TELL THE FASHION IN VALUABLE TIME

Modal verbs do not narrate the real time. Their manner is relative to real time, as they mediate between the grammatical Time and Aspect. The name "modal" comes from the Latin word "modus", meaning an extent or measure, too. ■→More

8.2. PRACTICE FOR ALL ASPECTS

We practice earthling proper egoism: we ignore cues that would not be properly "egoistic" and "gravitational":
The butterfly (kiss) the bee in the midst of her phiz, when he (see) the golden grit. ■→More

8.1. EARTHLING BASIC COGNITIVE VARIABLE

Planet Earth has been a natural habitat for millennia. In thousands of years, people to think what there is {ON} a map, have not denied plausibility for places {IN} areas, routes {TO} places, as well as locations {AT} them. Early childhood learning to talk has been getting along with learning to walk. Human postural control will favor one variable for the basis of all Aspects and tenses. ■→More

CHAPTER 8. A PERFECT AND PROGRESSIVE REGARD

Matters may never be what they seem, but they are what they look: the Perfect Progressive does merge the Perfect and the Progressive. All Perfect tenses have an open time frame. ■→More

7.1. PRACTICE FOR THE HEART AND THE MIND

We practice deciding between the Simple and the Progressive, variables {ON} and {IN}. We exercise thought, and our answers may vary. ■→More

CHAPTER 7. TIME IN THE MIND AND HEART

There are many grammar books to tell about “stative” or “static verbs”; that we should never use them with the Progressive; that phrases as "I am loving" or "I am hating" are incorrect. In fact, such phrases do occur also in educated styles, and without the brain, the heart is just a muscle. ■→More

6.5. THE TARGET TIME AND FRAME

We use time frames and symbolic cues, to work as in the Mind Practice for the difference between the Simple and the Perfect. ■→More

6.3. EXERCISES: THE ASPECT AND THE TIME FRAME

Mind practice for the Aspect and the time frame:
2. The skylark found nothing to outbid the bit of cosmos with a squid.
8. The spotted redshank bachelorette bewailed, and reset her buret for the bouncing bet. ■→More

6.2. ASPECT COGNITIVE VARIABLE AND TIME FRAME

Madame Règle is not a systematic person at all. The only regularity about her would be a small book she always carries fastened to her bag with a scarf, or actually a variety of scarves, of many colors and textures. The book is not the same book every day, and the choice of the scarf sure depends on some totally unpredictable factor, just as the exact time for lunch, for which you might want to assume the broad time frame of about sixty minutes to commence or not to happen altogether. ■→More

6.1. OUR LINGUISTIC GRAVITATION

Our time extents, PRESENT and PAST, do not change for punctuation. They do not change for the Aspect, Simple or Perfect, either. To continue our work on the two Aspects, we choose on the grammatical time frame. ■→More

5.3. PRACTICE: REAL SYNTAX AND MORE WORDS

Abbreviated verb forms are really much in use in American English. It is important to learn telling them. We first try the exercises in our thoughts, as in the Mind Practice. ■→More

5.2. PRACTICE: SYMBOLIC CUES AND REAL SYNTAX

We combine the Aspect and Time, to exercise target grammatical time. We think the answers: true learning is in the mind. ■→More

5.1. THE LOGIC SO FAR

We sum up on the grammar logic so far, and visualize Time with Aspect — for efficient language habits with target grammatical time. ■→More

CHAPTER 5. LET US MAKE OWN PATHS ABOUT TIME

Phrases as the the Affirmative, Interrogative or Negative may look rare or even strange, if we compare everyday language. Let us think about something usual as a strawberry, to work them out. ■→More

4.2. PRACTICE: ASPECT COGNITIVE MAPPING

To think about grammatical time, we do not have to feel bound to fields and land travel, even if only symbolically. We can imagine a bald eagle {ON} Mount Elbert. He is nesting {IN} a valley, has flown {TO} the mountain top today, and has been staying {AT} the summit, all this warm day. The eagle route has four types of reference. ■→More

CHAPTER 4. TIME RAMBLES DIFFERENT WITH DIFFERENT PEOPLE

Human walking or other moving about needs place and time, yet it does not need anybody to describe, give rules or definitions. We can connect the grammatical aspect and basic ways we people orientate in physical space. More→

3.4. PRACTICE FOR THE SHAPE OF TIME

We have a little exercise on Aspect pattern build, before we reckon on Aspect use. To get along at school, we think about grammar labels, that is, if patterns are the Simple, Progressive, Future, Past, or another — the way as in our Mind Practice, 3 minutes to read. ■→More

3.2. THE PERSON ‘YOU’

In a standard, face-to-face conversation, it is naturally easy to tell if we speak with one or more persons. However, the pronoun you has evolved into the same shape for the singular and the plural. The form is also the same as verb object. ■→More

3.1. THE FIELDS AND THE RIVER OF TIME

Whether English is spoken or written, verb forms be and have are the most usual to occur. We can extract patterns for the Simple, Progressive, and Perfect. ■→More

CHAPTER 3. TIME IS LIKE A RIVER

Everyday language has phrases as a flow or passage of time, a course or current of events: we people happen to have such impressions about life and time. Let us imagine a river of time. There are word patterns to show in the river, and there are pods of time to surface with them. We need to use a pattern, for a pod to carry us through. ■→More .

CHAPTER 2. THE FUTURE NEEDS THE PRESENT

humans have evolved grammars along with perception for three-dimensional space. There never has been really at hand any fourth or time independently dimension, to make language. The real time we people live in is always our PRESENT. The verb form "will" can map on the real-time FUTURE already in its PRESENT grammatical shape. ■→More

CHAPTER 1. WE CAN PLAN ON TIME AS IN FIELDS

We cannot touch time. We cannot see or hear time. Clocks can show the time only as we set it, and grammatical time is not the same thing as the hour. How can we learn the grammatical time, then? To an extent, we may think about time together with place. More→

COLORS CAN HELP READ AND LEARN

In our language journey, pronouns and nouns are ink blue. Highlights and mapping extents are forget-me-not, blue. We avoid color red, for the prevalent and adverse associations with prescriptive opinion on language. ■→More