10.3. WORKOUT FOR REAL-TIME TALK

We can use Form Relativity with the Progressive and real verbs. We can use stories. “I’d be reading horoscopes”, says Ms. Seges. “That is …?” (Mr. Seges does not believe Ms. Seges would ever read horoscopes.) “This looks like a calligraphic copy of Vespucci’s letters. It was slipping out of our backyard hedge, no covers or front matter.” “Hadn’t it sure taken a lot to make such a book, I’d suspect that Babbitt next door. Bill once wrote me the book I was looking for was as likely to be obtained as a calligraphic of Vespucci’s originals. It was completely a legend, he checked with the Freeman’s.”

10.1. THE UNREAL PAST OR CONDITIONAL: REAL TIME

PICTURE: ABSTRACT TIME

We do not have to view Modal, Conditional, or Unreal Past patterns as separate. With Perfect tenses, our syntactic HAVE helps tell about real time. It has an open real-time frame. With the Unreal Past or Conditional, HAVE tells about hypothetical time. HAVE is not part the real map, then. It comes with an auxiliary compass for relative time.

9.1. MODAL SYNTAX, GRAMMATICAL PRESENT OR PAST

PICTURE: CLOCKS SHOWING DIFFERENT TIMES

Let us focus on the auxiliary have. Would it make antecedent time extents altogether? Antecedent time extents always would be relative to the head time. To shape up a good idea for head verbs and time, we can venture common sense, as also in literature. The common sense truth here is that it can take real time to make hypotheses, but hypothetical time could never be the same as real time.

CHAPTER 8. ALCHEMY OF TIME FOR BEGINNERS

Most grammar resources agree that we have four Aspects in English, the Simple, the Progressive (or Continuous), the Perfect, and the Perfect Progressive (or Perfect Continuous). By the label, we can say the Perfect Progressive should have features of the Perfect and the Progressive. We extracted general patterns for the Simple, Progressive, and Perfect in … Continue reading CHAPTER 8. ALCHEMY OF TIME FOR BEGINNERS

CHAPTER 7. TIME IN THE MIND AND HEART

We may find grammar books to tell about “stative” or “static verbs”. The books give lists of such verbs to remember and not to use with the Progressive. Let us think if we could list all words we might associate with love and hate in the alphabetical order, for example? Listing the words would take a long time, and we can speak, write, and read real-time.

6.5. THE TARGET TIME AND FRAME

We have our time frames for our guidance. Overall, we can choose between the Simple and the Perfect, in the PAST time compass. We are about to think on talking about feelings and minds. Chantelle’s first book tells about a girl’s language of the heart. Art Veltall is thinking about a job change. Contending his mother-in-law yet resembles trying verbally to captivate a moving rock …

6.4. MORE GRAMMAR AND WORD PRACTICE

Grammar exercises can "buy" us some luck at tests and exams — here we have some more of our grammar "good luck boutique", and good American does not have to be grave serious. More→
Emoticon, a smile

6.2. GRAMMAR COGNITIVE GROUND

Isolated word form, whether auditory or visual, is not enough to convey language information. We can work our time frames only in context.

6.1. LINGUISTIC GRAVITATION

There is a use in language we could compare to a natural phenomenon on Earth, namely gravitation. It can help us choose on the time frame and decide between the Perfect or Simple Aspects. More→

5.3. PRACTICE: REAL SYNTAX AND MORE WORDS

Abbreviated verb forms are really much in use in American English. It is important to learn telling and using them. For irregular verbs, we have appendixes with high and low, or back and front vowel patterns. We take the exercises in our minds, as in our Mind practice. More→.