10.3. MORE FORM RELATIVITY PRACTICE

We learn to perceive the nodal time:
B. The grain of sand did one hour of thinking about composite things a day, and appreciated the activity as emotionally valid. ■→More

10.1. UNREAL OR REAL TIME

No group and no Government can properly prescribe precisely what should constitute the body of knowledge with which true education is concerned.
— President Franklin Delano Roosevelt ■→More

9.1. AUXILIARY HAVE AND MODAL SYNTAX

Modal verbs narrate on thought, let us say, if we think something is a fruit, is a possible fruit, or maybe it even must be fruit, but we do not know the kind.
Whatever theory to make, it is first of all our thought process we need to manage. ■→More

CHAPTER 8. A PERFECT AND PROGRESSIVE REGARD

Matters may never be what they seem, but they are what they look: the Perfect Progressive does merge the Perfect and the Progressive. All Perfect tenses have an open time frame. ■→More

CHAPTER 7. TIME IN THE MIND AND HEART

There are many grammar books to tell about “stative” or “static verbs”; that we should never use them with the Progressive; that phrases as "I am loving you" or "I am hating you" are incorrect. In fact, such phrases do occur also in educated styles, and more, without the brain and mind, the heart is just a muscle. ■→More

6.5. THE TARGET TIME AND FRAME

We use time frames and symbolic cues, to work as in the Mind Practice for the difference between the Simple and the Perfect. ■→More

6.4. MORE PRACTICE: THE GRAMMATICAL FRAME, VARIABLE, AND FORM

4. After some study of a number of ideas on the cosmos, she (picture) the humanity as an odd kind of fish in a series of still larger fish tanks. Early in the series, there (be) N any point to try bringing another fish tank to imagination. It (require) adding more fish tanks. ■→More

6.2. ASPECT COGNITIVE VARIABLE AND TIME FRAME

Madame Règle is not a systematic person at all. The only regularity about her would be a small book she always carries fastened to her bag with a scarf or, actually, a variety of scarves of many colors and textures. The book is not the same book every day, and the choice of the scarf sure depends on some totally unpredictable factor, just as the exact time for lunch, for which you might want to assume the broad time frame of about sixty minutes to commence or not to happen altogether. ■→More

6.1. OUR LINGUISTIC GRAVITATION

We people can share novelty, as well as speak without looking to the hour. We may resort to natural Earth and think gravitation. to choose on the grammatical time frame. ■→More

5.3. PRACTICE: REAL SYNTAX AND MORE WORDS

Abbreviated verb forms are really much in use in American English. It is important to learn telling them. We first try the exercises in our thoughts, as in the Mind Practice. ■→More

5.2. PRACTICE: SYMBOLIC CUES AND REAL SYNTAX

Symbols can be really helpful, whe we want effective and effortless language habits. Let us combine the Aspect and Time, to exercise symbolic cues. We try only to think about our answers: true learning is in the mind. ■→More

5.1. THE LOGIC SO FAR

We sum up on the grammar logic so far, and visualize Time along with Aspect for efficient language habits. ■→More

CHAPTER 5. LET US MAKE OWN PATHS ABOUT TIME

The Affirmative, Interrogative or Negative may look rare or even strange, if we think about everyday language. Let us reckon on something usual as a strawberry, to work these phrases out. ■→More

4.2. PRACTICE: ASPECT COGNITIVE MAPPING

To think about grammatical time, we do not have to feel bound to fields and land travel, even if only symbolically. We can imagine a bald eagle ON Mount Elbert. He nests IN a valley, flies TO the mountain top, and stays AT the summit, for warm days. The eagle route has four types of reference. ■→More

CHAPTER 4. TIME RAMBLES DIFFERENT WITH DIFFERENT PEOPLE

Human walking or other moving about needs place and time, yet it does not need anybody to describe, give rules or definitions. We can connect the grammatical aspect and basic ways we people orientate in physical space. More→

3.4. PRACTICE FOR THE SHAPE OF TIME

We have a little exercise on Aspect pattern build, before we reckon on Aspect use. To get along at school, we think about grammar labels, that is, if patterns are the Simple, Progressive, Future, Past, or another — the way as in our Mind Practice, 3 minutes to read. ■→More

3.1. THE FIELDS AND THE RIVER OF TIME

Whether English is spoken or written, verb forms be and have are the most usual to occur. We can extract patterns for the Simple, Progressive, and Perfect. ■→More

CHAPTER 3. TIME IS LIKE A RIVER

Everyday language has phrases as a flow or passage of time, a course or current of events: we people happen to have such impressions about life and time. Let us imagine a river of time. There are word patterns to show in the river, and there are pods of time to surface with them. We need to use a pattern, for a pod to carry us through. ■→More .